Tackling Stress: Who Moved My Cheese?

Change in our lives can be something we go with or can resist. Change can generate a LOT of stress. We all know that stress + anxiety + time = depression. If the stats are to be believed then up to 70 % of people are hard wired against change. They are the people who oil the systems and make processes happen smoothly, they are stable and reliable. But, they find change a challenge. So the subject of change is really pertinent now in 2017 with Brexit under consideration and Trump entering the White House. If you have read it before I certainly recommend you read it again to underwrite your foundation in these challenging times. If we can manage change we can manage our stress and reduce the likelihood of becoming depressed.

Who Moved My Cheese

Who Moved My Cheese by Dr Spencer Johnson

Who Moved My Cheese: An amazing way to deal with change in your work and in your life

Dr Spencer Johnson 2000 Random House

A great plus point for this book is that it can be read in about an hour. It is a parable about change, our response to it and what we tell ourselves and other about change. It covers a LOT in a few short pages. The Cheese, according to Johnson, is a metaphor for what we want in life and the maze represents our life – it’s where we look for what we want. The parable details two mice and two people searching for and finding (or not) cheese in a maze. The mice are Sniff and Scurry and the people, Hem and Haw. Yes, their names tell us a lot about them, but we learn a whole lot more as we read.

The book opens a door on our future – on the change that is part of our lives, whether we expect it or not, accept it or not. Change can be relentless; one of the things we can count on along with taxes and death. The story covers simple truths with unique insights; it will get you thinking about yourself and those you know. It sounds complicated, but in reality is easy to understand, prompting the reader to new levels and successes having recognised change and coped with it. The message is clear, told with easy recognisable characters and humour. You will recognise yourself (and your colleagues) or possibly your family and friends.

There is enough in the story to explore the four characters, their individual sets of behaviour, abilities and responses. We are able to look forward to the future and back over the past from the lessons it details and the observations it makes.

I found the book provided a need to review, to laugh and to share.

It is obtainable here.

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